Amongst high tides; be the change and challenge ourselves

Amongst high tides; be the change and challenge ourselves

I am reading the report while sitting in our community wellbeing centre where people have been making lanterns for next month’s Christmas parade. The centre, Toynbee Hall, is tucked in between ever growing towers of concrete and glass that have come to dominate our area here in east London, but is warm and welcoming for older people from every background.

Reading the reports it is clear that very many organisations – and even more informal groups within communities – are on the same journey. They – and we –  are undoubtedly making life better within those communities (nb to those who might challenge this with ‘where’s your evidence?’ , I’d just invite them to ask the people making lanterns if their lives are better or worse for the time they now spend socializing and doing interesting things in each other’s company, and listen to the responses).  The report is full of optimism and the belief that civil society IS innately powerful and relevant.

And yet the reports don’t shy away from the fact that we’re up against huge tides. Economic and social deprivation, leading to poverty, isolation, cynicism and disengagement. So I like the way they challenge us not only to demand change – but to BE that change; challenge ourselves. To take risks, be open, listen – even if it is uncomfortable – and find solutions together. Perhaps we need to remind ourselves of the struggles that our predecessors have fought and won – the progress that has been made. At Toynbee Hall our history is something we’ve over the past few years really began to see as a huge asset as we’ve sought to open ourselves up and rebuild connections we might have lost. We can learn from the past, in taking on today’s struggles. We can inspire a better future. It won’t be easy – it never has been. But civil society does have power. It is enormous in terms of its scale, for one thing. So if we can each make change on a local, community or even individual level each, we’ll have made a significant difference. This isn’t about limiting our ambition. It is the opposite: fulfilling it. We’re up for it. Thank you for articulating the challenge.

 

23rd November 2018

One comment

  1. Alexander says:

    Groups taking power causes neglect or abuse of those who have different interests and priorities to those of the groups taking power. Dividing society into groups of diverse beliefs, morals and agendas and giving them power over others is not the answer to the injustices that have plagued human society since time immemorial.

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